Al Seymour

Climate change threatens all future life on Earth

  • Lessons from our youth: Fridays for Future Bermuda joined the global campaign yesterday in the fight to raise awareness on climate change. Friday marked the start of a weeklong worldwide demonstration (Photograph by Akil Simmons)
  • Lessons from our youth: Fridays for Future Bermuda joined the global campaign yesterday in the fight to raise awareness on climate change. Friday marked the start of a weeklong worldwide demonstration (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

The subject is of grave concern because scientists from around the world, after lengthy studies of global atmospheric conditions, have concluded that unless nations collectively address this escalating problem, which stems from massive industrial systems affecting our earthly protective shield from the Sunís powerful rays, the future is more than frightening.

To some, climate change is of little interest, especially in countries where violent conflicts over ideological differences leave men, women and children bleeding and dying in the streets almost on a daily basis.

As one doctor in a war-torn region put it, trying to save a child dying from bullet wounds caused him to weep when he went home to his own family. Bitter differences, often politically based, could also be at the centre of why the issue of climate change is yet to awaken the world on a larger scale. That it is reality; not science fiction.

Perhaps one day it will be world leaders who weep with shame for placing financial gain over trying to protect the Earthís climate for future generations. Without action now, weeping at that stage would be a waste of tears.

As nations and political leaders wrangle over the subject, watched closely by powerful industrial giants, many people conclude that not much will happen for change, as long as companies view profits as far more important than weather talk. Since a lack of decisive action will affect how young people feel about their future, it is encouraging that many youths in America are taking their concerns before Congress.

One young lady bluntly told political officials that she felt so strong about the issue that she saw studying as useless without a future. As a form of protest for action, she said many students will use each Friday as a day for gathering more support to urge the Government to act on helping to protect the Earth.

As the oceans become warmer, scientists predict more powerful hurricanes and weather conditions that threaten people in many regions. The recent Hurricane Dorian, which left scores dead in the Bahamas with further damage along the US East Coast, was certainly on a scale that many said they had never seen before.

Yes, itís true there have always been hurricanes, but the likelihood of more with greater power is disturbing.

Meanwhile, evidence continues to grow, showing ice melting in the Arctic at a rate much faster than previously expected. What this really means is that in time, with oceans rising, many countries including Bermuda would be under threat from water levels that are higher than land areas.

While it is an unpleasant thought, there is no need to panic yet. There is still time for nations to take action in helping to reduce the threat. However, without full global co-operation on a matter concerning survival on the planet, climate change will remain a threat to life as we know it.