After the storm is time to show resilience

  • David Burt, the Premier, displays his face mask before a daily government briefing on Covid-19 (Photograph by Blaire Simmons)

    David Burt, the Premier, displays his face mask before a daily government briefing on Covid-19 (Photograph by Blaire Simmons)


After a powerful storm anywhere in the world, people affected slowly come out from various shelters and wrecked homes to survey damage and usually assist those in need of help. During those early moments, everyone without question is aware that, for many, life would never be the same again — especially when there is loss of life.

Here in Bermuda, we have seen many storms, some tragically with loss of life, but Bermudians usually push any differences aside to help in any way possible to aid those in physical or economic distress. That is the way most Bermudians react in the face of a situation when our people are in need of assistance.

That also seems to be the spirit in most countries when, outside of an act of war, people are confronted with Nature’s power or a deadly disease such as Covid-19, which has rocked the world, leaving millions in fear of when this war against this new virus will be won.

The death toll has been staggering around the world, with scientists, medical experts and world leaders scrambling to come to grips with an invisible threat that has brought much of the world to a standstill. While there is much talk of the economic impact for countries around the world, Bermuda included, beneath the surface it has also taken a toll on our way of life.

The impact varies from country to country, with some families in more desperate circumstances than others. However, pain and emotional suffering knows no boundaries during a crisis that shatters lives of the wealthy and the poor.

With such a health menace globally, governments, outside of normal challenges, are forced to go the extra mile in trying to save lives and keep people safe.

Government leader David Burt has indicated he will go any extra miles needed to avoid the type of spreading of the coronavirus in Bermuda that has devastated so many countries with massive loss of life, and has created a nightmare for the medical professions in treating the sick. It is more than encouraging that the Opposition OBA leader, Craig Cannonier, has thrown full support behind the effort to protect Bermuda and its people,

The journey ahead will require every ounce of effort to get through this storm and to meet the challenges left in its wake, which will consist of trying to regroup with all our resources in light of the economic impact from a tourist industry on hold, and business as usual — at least for the moment — a thing of the past.

Bermuda has bounced back from many difficult times throughout its history and each time we have been stronger. There will be much work to be done after this storm to get the Bermuda wheels rolling again. It will be far from easy, but much will depend on our willingness to work together.

The job ahead is too big for political wrangling. Only with full bipartisan co-operation, with Bermuda first, can we hope to some day look back at this moment and smile, knowing we all did our best to keep Bermuda that very special place in the Atlantic we call home.

The road ahead will be tough, but that is what will make us stronger.

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Published Apr 9, 2020 at 8:00 am (Updated Apr 9, 2020 at 7:51 am)

After the storm is time to show resilience

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