Young Observer

Thrill at public speaking competition

  • Somerset Primary assembly
  • Seri Fisher and her father perform anti-drug message on stage at Somerset Primary assembly
  • Students at CedarBridge Academy visit The Royal Gazette

Warwick Academy

Three Warwick Academy students, with nine years of public speaking and debating experience between them, last month travelled to Winnipeg, Canada to see who could speak the best.

The girls, An Mei Daniels (13), McKenzie-Kohl Tuckett (14), and Chiara Marshall (15), alongside their coach Stephanie Sinclair, took part in the International Independent Schools Public Speaking Competition, an annual tournament that sees teams from across the world gather to compete in several categories; After Dinner speeches and Parliamentary Debates, to name just two.

There were more than 40 teams from as far afield as Scotland and South Korea, and Warwick Academy also competed against teams from BHS and Saltus Grammar School.

All three students did extremely well. Chiara competed in the After Dinner finals and was the

top-ranked Bermudian at the tournament, while Mckenzie-Kohl finished fourteenth in the Dramatic Interpretation category.

The competition was an amazing experience for all three girls.

“I had a great time competing with others and learning to become better,” An Mei said.

“My favourite thing about the trip was getting to experience what an international competition was like.”

Ms Tuckett agreed with her team-mate. She said: “The competition was awesome. I’m really happy with the new friendships that were created.”

However, it wasn’t always a party for the students.

“It was definitely nerve-racking to compete on an international level for the first time,” recalled Chiara.

“But once you stood up, it was like all your nerves vanished. Plus, everyone was so supportive, which definitely made the competition more fun.”

When asked if they wanted to go back, all three students firmly responded “yes”, mentioning that plans for next year’s material were already being made.

“I’m looking forward to participating in IISPSC again,” McKenzie-Kohl said. Ms Daniels is also excited at the possibility of going again and the

opportunity to meet even more people.

The girls’ sights are now set on Bermuda’s national competition, and welcoming anyone new to join them.

“Doing this really helped me come out of my shell,” said Ms Marshall, “and I’d love to help someone do the same.”

After Bermuda’s national tournament in the spring, the girls are also hopeful of being able to compete in the World tournament next year in South Africa.

All in all, the three students were overjoyed at the opportunity to compete, and look forward to the next time they can display their skills.

CedarBridge Academy

A group of students aged between 15 and 18 had a tour at The Royal Gazette last week. We took the opportunity to ask the students a few questions on their aspirations and time at CedarBridge Academy.

Zehaire Adams (S3)

What are your career goals?

I’d like to be a technical theatre or video game tester and designer.

Who is your favourite teacher?

Ms Patricia Nesbitt is my favourite because she is not a teacher who gives up. She works with us and goes beyond the normal teacher. This drama teacher is a queen to all whom she teaches.

What is your favourite memory of CedarBridge Academy?

My favourite memory is 100 men and women on campus. This is when students dress for success and talk to people about future careers. There is a fashion show too.

What makes you proud about your school?

The programmes are unlike any other. We are an all-round school with something for everyone.

Anya Williams (S2)

What are your career goals?

I would like to be a photographer.

Who is your favourite teacher?

Ms Muhammad. She’s my favourite because she makes sure we have a good day. She also makes sure work is getting done.

What is your favourite memory of

CedarBridge Academy?

My favourite memory was a special sports day when we really enjoyed ourselves at National Stadium.

What makes you proud about your school?

I like the competitiveness. I like the

determination and eagerness in everyone when blue and red house go up against each other and how we manage to stay friendly.

Share Paynter (S3)

What are your career goals?

To be a chef or professional cricketer.

Who is your favourite teacher?

My favourite teacher is Mrs Wolfe.

What makes you proud about your school?

How well we do in sports. We have a lot of students who come first both in school sports and international ones.

Vanessa Viera (S3)

What makes you proud about your school?

It has so many different courses we can choose from.

J’Zinde Robinson (S3)

What are your career goals?

I would like to become a musician.

Who is your favourite teacher?

Mrs Smith, because she always makes sure that I have supplies for school and she always makes sure we are OK.

What makes you proud about your school?

Our school spirit makes me proud.

Zanikae Hendrickson (S3)

What are your career goals?

I’d like to be a PE teacher or a professional footballer.

Who is your favourite teacher?

Ms Edwards because if I have problems with work, she is always there to help me.

What makes you proud of your school?

I’m proud of the number of options school offers to prepare us for the working world.

Jakia Minors (S1)

What are your career goals?

I would like to be a nurse.

Who is your favourite teacher?

Ms Landy, our art teacher, because she is honest, real and has a big heart.

Jah-von Morgan (S4)

What are your career goals?

I would like to work in architecture or be a professional footballer.

What is your favourite memory of

CedarBridge Academy?

It was a few weeks ago, when everyone raised funds for breast cancer.

What makes you proud of your school?

Every day Mrs Kalmar Richards greets every child and my teachers push me to strive for excellence.

Somerset Primary

Seri Fisher performed her Pride anti-drug message at the Somerset Primary assembly last Friday. With her father, she entertained the entire audience.

While Seri took to the piano and sang her song for all of her peers, Mr Fisher took to the stage and explained to the audience the importance of making good decisions instead of bad ones.

He told the audience to “think it out” and “to stand up and be a part of the solution”.

Here are the song lyrics, which Seri wrote with her father:

Solution Revolution

Hey! You! ... Yes, You! ... I’m talking to you!

Drug abuse needs a solution.

Join the B.D.A. Revolution.

Don’t allow body pollution.

Stand up! Be the solution.

People are sellin.

But they’re not tellin.

The harm it does to you.

But it ain’t funny.

The harm it does to you.

Don’t just follow the crowd.

Say “no”! and be real loud.

That’s called being so so proud.

It’s your body, it’s allowed.

People are sellin.

But they’re not tellin.

The harm it does to you.

But it ain’t funny.

The harm it does to you.

Stand up … be the solution.

Don’t just talk.

We’re your children.